45 Followers
4 Following
MiriamReads

MiriamReads

Currently reading

As I Descended
Robin Talley
Long Hidden: Speculative Fiction from the Margins of History
'Christi, 'Kima Jones', 'Benjamin Parzybok', 'Michael Janairo', 'Jamey Hatley', 'Robert William Iveniuk', 'L.S. Johnson', 'Claire Humphrey', 'Meg Jayanth', 'Rion Amilcar Scott', 'Sunny Moraine', 'S Lynn', 'Tananarive Due', 'Thoraiya Dyer', 'Sofia Samatar'
City Folk: English Country Dance and the Politics of the Folk in Modern America
Daniel Walkowitz

Magic Under Glass

Magic Under Glass - Jaclyn Dolamore Magic Under Glass deals admirably with both racism and sexism; mostly this is apparent in characters’ reactions to Nim, but a potent mixture or racism and nationalism is also found in their views towards fairies and the nearby fairy country. Most impressively, this racially-tinged nationalism is seen even in characters who are not villains, while not being portrayed as acceptable; it condemns the anti-fairy sentiment while acknowledging that well-intentioned, kind-hearted people can say and believe things that make us cringe. There are some interesting twists, especially in the limitations of magic, but there’s also a Jane Eyre parallel that falls rather flat. The portrayals of romance in the book are likewise mixed. The central romance, that between Nim and the man in the man in the automaton, is predictable and and its lack of development becomes problematic late in the story, when their circumstances shift and their emotions fail to respond. On the other hand, there are the visible remnants of a relationship that clearly was, at one point, deeply loving, but has realistically altered and shifted into something entirely different as the people and situations changed; an unrequited romantic interest—clear and hopeful, hesitant and uncreepy—further adds complexity and nuance. The conclusion certainly paves the way for the forthcoming sequel, but it is a conclusion and not a cliffhanger or abrupt cut-off.