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MiriamReads

MiriamReads

Currently reading

As I Descended
Robin Talley
Long Hidden: Speculative Fiction from the Margins of History
'Christi, 'Kima Jones', 'Benjamin Parzybok', 'Michael Janairo', 'Jamey Hatley', 'Robert William Iveniuk', 'L.S. Johnson', 'Claire Humphrey', 'Meg Jayanth', 'Rion Amilcar Scott', 'Sunny Moraine', 'S Lynn', 'Tananarive Due', 'Thoraiya Dyer', 'Sofia Samatar'
City Folk: English Country Dance and the Politics of the Folk in Modern America
Daniel Walkowitz

The Mockingbirds

The Mockingbirds - Daisy Whitney Risk of retraumatization for those with sexual misconduct-related trigger issues.Written by a date rape survivor, The Mockingbirds is painful and powerful. It’s extremely well written and forthright, dealing candidly with the gamut of emotions experienced by survivors: anger, illogical coping mechanisms, denial, guilt, confusion, fear. It gets into the way rape can affect all aspects of the survivor’s life; Alex is no longer comfortable walking around the school grounds or eating in the cafeteria, certain classes are difficult, whether because of her rapist or because of his friends, and even music, her primary interest and love, has been tainted by what happened. Though the plot revolves around the process of her case with the Mockingbirds, the emotional core and character development is in her slowly and haltingly reclaiming her life, her body, her sexuality, and her mind, from her trauma and post-traumatic stress. Alex’s friends and sister are amazing but realistic; they are angry on her behalf and they know what they want her to do, but they know they need to support her in what she wants to do and can handle doing, and not push her. Her assailant is also, unfortunately, realistic, oblivious to consent issues and never thinking of his actions as rape. The one false note was a series of connected English assignments; the assignment is reasonable, the extent to which the teacher takes it does not feel reasonable, and the teachers actions are hard to explain except as malicious—but the teacher is given no motivation or reason for malicious behavior. It’s a relatively small lapse in a book that is otherwise brilliant, dealing with a difficult issue with both honesty and sensitivity, and without leaving any doubt that the absence of a yes must always be assumed to be a no.